backpacking gear checklist ultralight

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Essential Backpacking Gear For Any Location

This is your standard essential gear that will always be with you on every trip.

Trail Backpack: Tactical Waterproof Backpack

Tent: Big Agnes

  • Weight: 2lbs, 6oz
  • Fits two people
  • Push button LED lights incorporated into the seams of the tent.

Sleeping bag

Sleeping mat: Inflatable DownMat

  • Weight: 1lbs 5oz.
  • Radiates your body heat back to you.

Hydration Bladder: RedRock Molle Hydration pack

  • Weight: 15.8 oz.

Lantern

I personally prefer low light lanterns since the strong LED lights can get in the way of seeing the stars. I was very impressed with this inflatable solar lantern. It worked better than I thought it would and lasted all night.

Headlamp: Black Diamond Headlamp

  • Weight: 3.25 oz. (with batteries)
  • Waterproof
  • Red night vision and strobe modes

Day Pack

If you are planning to set up camp and then go on day hikes from that location. I double by hydration bladder as a day pack and can fit snack etc. in the pack around the bladder.

Safety Equipment & Tools

First Aid Kit: Adventure Medical Kits

  • Weight: Less than 1.5 lbs.

Mirror & Whistle: 7-in-1 Survival Tool

  • Weight: 1.6 oz.

If you have a regular mirror and whistle just laying around, that’s great too. This one comes with a few more accessories. You never know where you’re going to be if you’re stuck and need help. With no cell service and unable to move, this whistle is louder and uses less energy than your voice and the mirror can be used to signal for help from miles away.

Leatherman/ Knife: TTI Multi-Tool

  • Weight: 8.2 oz.

Backpacking Kitchen Gear

Stove: Large Camping Burner

  • Weight: 9.6 oz.

Fuel Canister: Coleman Fuel Canister

Double check that this matches with your stove before heading out!

Lighter

Bring multiple just in case something happens to the first one.

Cook ware: HUKOER Camping Mess Kit

Utensils: Stainless Steel Sporks

  • Weight: .8 oz.
  • Comes with a case

Filtration/purification Tablets: Package of 30

  • Weight: .9 oz.
  • Destroys viruses and bacteria in 15 min., Giardia in 30 min. and Cryptosporidium in 4 hrs.
  • Use 1 tablet per quart of water

collapsible-cup-camping

Mug: Silicone Collapsible Camping Mugs

  • Weight: 5 oz.
  • Keeps beverages hot or cold

Food Vault

  • Large
    • Weight: 2lbs, 9oz.
    • Capacity: 11.5 ltr
  • Small
    • Weight: 2lbs, 1oz
    • Capacity: 7.2 ltr

Trash bag/ Storage: Trash Dry Sack

  • Weight: 3.5 oz.
  • Odor free handy trash storage

Dish soap

Use an old travel shampoo/conditioner bottle and refill it with dish soap. You’ll only need a very small amount.

Small sponge

Cut a normal sponge in half – that’s all you’ll need.

Empty Water Jug

If camping near a water source, bring an empty jug that you can then fill with water and purify with your tablets.

Backpacking Food

There is a wide variety of food options when you’re backpacking or camping. It’s really all up to your personal preference and tastes.

3 Day Backpacking Meal Plan Available Here

Hobo/Foil Packets

I’m a big fan of hobo packets. These are generally more appropriate for car camping where you aren’t carrying everything with you, but for a little treat, I still like to prepare a packet that can be heated up as my “first meal” when backpacking. Hobo packets won’t last since they ideally would be refrigerated, but if you eat it as your first meal or even for breakfast the next morning, they won’t have spoiled yet.

My Favorites:

Toiletries

Toothpaste & Brush: Travel Kit with Case

Deodorant

Sunscreen: Neutrogena SPF 110

Bug Spray

Containing Deet

Chap stick/Lip Balm: Botanica SPF 25

Wipes: Biodegradable wipes

Hand sanitizer

Travel Size

If no latrines are available:

Toilet paper and ziplock bag

Sanitation Trowel: GSI Trowel

Read more about the principles of Leave No Trace »

Clothing for Backpacking


Bring only the essentials that you absolutely need in your pack. Also, aim for quick-drying fabrics that don’t hold in moisture.

Hiking boots

While on my last backpacking trip the heels of my hiking boots literally fell off, so I’m searching for my next amazing pair. Thus far I’m using Lowa Ferrox GTX, which are working great! They’re VEGAN (no leather), waterproof, and breathable, which covers all of my needs.

If you don’t know where to start shopping for boots, read this guide on how to choose the best hiking boot for you.

Hiking socks

Many great options available on REI and Amazon or your local outdoor store. Find what feels best for you with your boots. Avoid Cotton since it doesn’t breath and absorbs moisture. I’m a fan of these light Smartwool socks.

Camp shoes/ flip flops

Something comfortable to wear around camp other than your hiking boots. I really like these Rubber Sole Mesh Water Shoes.

Down (or other warm) jacket: Nano Lightweight Jacket By 32 Degrees

My mom bought me this jacket for Christmas and it’s been great. I wear it day-to-day and on my trip to Iceland and Peru. Its light enough that it’s not too hot when unzipped, but also nice and toasty when zipped. It’s also fairly form fitting and flattering and is slightly water resistant. Most importantly, 32 Degrees is has a Responsible Down Standard certification, ensuring that the down does not come from any animals subjected to unnecessary harm such as force feeding or live plucking.

Rain Top: Stretch Anorak Waterproof Jacket By 32 Degrees

Comfortable, form fitting, and does a good job of keeping out water. I particularly like the stretch material so that you don’t feel confined when wearing it.

Rain Pants: Side Zip Rain Pants

Not something I often use, but when you need then, you’ll be glad you have them! I like since it makes it easier to get them on and off, especially when wet.

Sports bra

Since I’m fairly small chested and will double my swim suit top for this if bringing my swim suit anyway. There are several good options available from REI.com

Tank top/ Tshirt

Something out of your closet that’s comfortable and form fitting. If you want to be “super pro” about it, you can go for a wicking shirt to keep moisture away from your body.

Long sleeve layer

I just like to use a regular thin long-sleeve shirt for this and then layer a tank-top under it if I get cold. Something similar to this long underwear top. If backpacking in cold weather, you might want to consider a Smartwool zip up jacket instead.

Shorts or legging: Beyond Yoga Leggings

I generally prefer leggings to protect my legs from getting cut up on dried grass or branches or from walking through poison oak. Beyond Yoga has a great variety of fashionable and functional leggings.

Warm hat

Hats are a great way to regular your body temperature without having to remove lots of layers. Any ski hat will be sure to keep you warm even in cold weather.

Sunglasses/ shade hat

Underwear

Sleeping clothes & comfy socks

I personally like to keep a “clean” pair of clothes and comfy socks to change into when sleeping that I haven’t been wearing outdoors and haven’t gotten sweaty. This can be any sort of comfy PJ tops and bottoms depending on the temperature.

Camera Gear/ Electronics


Honestly, camera phones have gotten so good, that you can use for the majority of your travels and get some amazing photos. Especially if you have a selfie stick and a lens kit. But for those looking for something more advanced:

Go Pro: HERO 5

I haven’t used this particular GoPro, however it shoots in 4k and is waterproof up to 10meter without a case. GoPros are amazing cameras specifically geared for ourdoor use.

DSLR: Canon Rebel T6i

I’ve had a T3i for years and it’s no longer made by the manufacturer, but this is the newest version of that same camera, which is probably better than mine.

Battery Charger: Portable Quick Charger

  • Weight: 6.4 oz.
  • 4x faster than other chargers

Music

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